McMaster University

McMaster University

India

Students from India programProject Title: 

Implementation and Evaluation of a Prevention Program on HIV/AIDS for Young Women in Southern India

Project Investigators: 

McMaster University (Canada): Basanti Majumdar, Carolyn Byrne, Gina Browne, Jacqueline Roberts, Tracey Chambers, Yvonne Lawlor, Jennifer Mitton, and Doraiswamy Janakiram; Manipal Academy of Higher Education (India): Anice George-Jain and Academy of Nursing Studies (India):  Marallavarapu Prakasamma

Funding Source: 

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); Global Health Research Pilot Project Grants

Summary

Conducted between March 2004 and February 2005, this project was based on the concept of participatory research. Working in collaboration, McMaster University (Canada), the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE, College of Nursing and Department of Community Medicine; Karnataka, India) and the Academy of Nursing Studies (ANS; Andhra Pradesh, India) combined resources to conduct a feasibility project to examine the development, implementation and evaluation of a culturally-sensitive, sustainable program in HIV/AIDS education and prevention for health care providers (HCP), including community health workers, traditional birth attendants, and trained grass-roots women, targeted at young girls and women (aged 13 to 24) in urban and rural areas of  Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka. This project aimed to increase the capacity of India’s health sector to educate and train its human resources in HIV/AIDS, and to develop a model that could be implemented in other Indian states and in other developing countries that are facing similar circumstances.

In small group sessions, a core group of HCP in Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka completed a participatory training process (using “Train the Trainer technique) to become master trainers and act as resources in HIV/AIDS education for young girls and women in India. All training was provided in both local languages. A training module (in both local languages) and teaching materials were also developed by the project partners. To examine the effectiveness of the training, each site selected the same number of women and young girls from rural and urban areas that were not trained by the project team, and compared their HIV/AIDS knowledge, skill and attitude, to those of trained women and girls.

Though the initial goal of the project was to establish a core group of 20 trained HCPs in Andhra Pradesh (n=10) and Karnataka (n=10), who would in turn provide education and training to 5 young community women in HIV/AIDS (a total of 100 women), our Indian partners successfully trained 50 HCP (20 in Karnataka; 30 in Hyderabad) and 490 women (250 in Karnataka; 240 in Hyderabad).  A core group of trained HCP and women will continue to train others, in order to ensure the sustainability of the training. As part of the dissemination process, project partners in Canada and India held a national symposium in India to coincide with the completion of the project, and to highlight its results.


Project Title: 

An Exploration of Socioeconomic, Spiritual, and Family Support among HIV-Positive Women in India.

Project Investigators: 

Dr. Basanti Majumdar, McMaster University (Canada)

Funding Source: 

The Shastri-Indo-Canadian-CIDA Institute

Summary

This pilot study explored the feelings and concerns of HIV-positive women in India, and the socio-economic, spiritual and family support available to them.This study found that, in addition to heterosexual contact, poverty and sexual violence contribute, indirectly, to the contraction of HIV. Emotional and mental anguish experienced by the women studied also contributed to their social isolation and feelings of helplessness and ultimately had a negative impact on their health.


Project Title: 

Medical and Nursing Students’ Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Violence Against Women in India

Project Investigator: 

Dr. Basanti Majumdar, McMaster University (Canada):

Funding Source: 

The Shastri-Indo Canadian Institute/Canadian Bureau of International Education (CBIE)

Summary

This study explored the knowledge and attitudes toward violence, among final year baccalaureate nursing students and final year medical students from two distinct educational institutions in India. Congruent with existing literature, the study demonstrated that students studying to become health care professionals in India do not receive sufficient training, practical skills, and classroom knowledge to effectively deal with woman abuse. The data from this study were used to develop a training manual on violence against women; targeted at health care provider

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Level Double-A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0